In the Garden – November

Things to Do…

Watering your plants

If you’re watering your houseplants with chlorinated water, allow the chlorine to outgas from the water by filling watering cans or bottles 24-48 hours before using. To avoid confusion as to what was watered when, mark a calendar that is kept with houseplant supplies.

Garden

  • Plant tulips now, but start daffodils in December. Tulips like moderate planting weather, and daffodils, cool to cold. Plant bulbs pointing up. Sometimes it is difficult to determine corm roots. If in doubt, plant on them on their side. Mark planting site using plastic knives or spoons to prevent planting on top of them.
  • Continue to treat broadleaf weeds. Protect good plants by placing carboard between spray and good plants. Let the spray settle before moving to the next plant. Sprays can be used during temperatures to 40 degrees and at least three days before a rain.
  • When mum flowers fade, plant in ground and cut back nearly to the ground.
  • Check attachments of climbing rose cane and retie as needed. Tie with strips of nylon stocking as they are soft and stretch.

Trees 

  • Order live and/or cut Christmas trees for delivery no sooner than mid-December. Select the location for the live tree and prepare its site. Contact in advance your city, park or school to donate your live tree.
  • Continue to plant new trees. Stake (two on per tree) through one season to let it settle in and build a strong root system.

Vegetables

  • Remove spent plants and continue to harvest producing ones.
  • Pull up tomato plants, and in an unheated place, wrap individual fruits in paper to ripen.
  • Wash, dry, and apply liquid wax to pumpkins to extend their useful life.
  • Dig root vegetables to store for the winter, except parsnips which sweeten the longer they stay in the ground.

 

Thanksgiving – The Cornucopia

Mrs. Wallis was a very gracious lady who was very involved with organizations in Paris, Lexington, and New York  She also loved sharing her gardens with both adults and children. No doubt this time of year, her dining table was filled with produce from the cutting and vegetable gardens, perhaps arranged in a cornucopia.

We owe the ancient Greeks and Romans for much of our culture from language, art, and even for many of us our traditional Thanksgiving table decorations, specifically the Cornucopia. The wicker basket derives its name from Latin [cornua (horn) and copia (plenty)] for its horn-shape filled to over-flowing with garden produce and flowers. The tradition stems from the Greek myth that Zeus, when he was an infant, broke a horn off a goat that then spilled out foods to nourish him.

As abundant as produce and flowers have been this year, it is appropriate that they should provide the centerpiece for Thanksgiving table. For those who do not have vegetable gardens, reserve a few of the vegetables that will be served on Thanksgiving and later. In place of the cornucopia, any container can be used.

Making the design can be tricky, as each piece must be secured or at least well balanced. I find it easiest to make it in place. Select your container and place it on a tray or water-proof placemat to protect the table. Collect wire, b-b-que skewers, florist stakes, and florist water picks.

Then select the produce. Choose your favorites, remembering you’re limited by the space available, and also do not use fruits or vegetables with high moisture content such as oranges or tomatoes.(too juicy unless hard green) and anything that will attract ants or other insects. Look for small pumpkins, eggplant (purple, white, etc.) corn (Indian, partially shucked yellow) gourds (all colors, sizes and skin texture), dried colorful leaves, potatoes, sweet potatoes, pomegranates.

A pumpkin or gourd stuffed in the opening of the basket provides weight to stabilize it and works an anchor for the vegetables. Place large vegetables first then fill in with smaller. For the last step, use skewers to pin grapes and other cascading fruits. Allow small produce to ‘spill’ out of the basket and on the backside as well.

If serving a buffet, place the cornucopia there.  On the dining table, you can place some of the small produce down the center, though of course, decorating is a personal thing. Do what pleases you.

 

October – Things to Do

Garden Tasks and Tips

  • Pansies are in full bloom. Given protection and a mild winter they will remain blooming through the winter.
  • Roses are at their peak. Prune only after they go dormant to reduce root damage from canes being whipped by high winds. Remove matted leaves from flowering plants. Cut flowers to encourage the last bloom of the fall. According to moon signs, today is the best day to plant those that flower. Fertile days the rest of the month are 25-26 and 30-31.
  • Lawn –Mow with the leaf shoot facing away from beds. Attach the grass bag to catch mulched leaves. Add to a compost pile or no more than 3 inches deep and away from shrub and tree trunks. Tree bark does not grow roots. It does soften when covered, setting it up for rodent and insect damage
  • Insects – Shorter days and cooler temperatures have brought stink bugs in for the winter. They are not destructive, just stink if frightened. They lay eggs in winter, nor bite. Controls: wipe screens with the strong smelling fabric softener sheets; Sarah Welsh, farmanddairy.com, recommends mixing in order: 2 cups hot water, 1 cup white vinegar, and ½ cup dish soap. Or use a tissue to pick the insect up, taking care not to pinch or step on it as it will stink. It is more efficient to vacuum to collect a large group, but discard bags immediately as they will hold the odor.
  • Vegetables – Grow tomatoes all winter. Bring in producing plants now to continue for a while. Bonnie L. Grant suggests planting tomato varieties Red Robin(best indoor variety) Yellow Pear and Burpee Basket King(hanging plants). Sow every two weeks for continuous production. Place in a sunny, southern window and turn for even growth.

Plan Ahead

Burpee is offering a reusable $10 discount on $25 plus orders through June 10, 2021. Limited to one discount per order.

Carolyn Roof

Native Plants for Pollinators and Wildlife


click this link below to download a printable chart

POLLINATOR PLANTS FOR GCKY

(from The Garden Club of Kentucky), gardenclubky.org

KEY:  s = sunny, ps = part sun, wd = well drained, d = dry, m = moist

Common Name Botanical Name Sun Water Ht Attracts Bloom Color
SPRING TO EARLY SUMMER BLOOMING
Beardtongue Penstemon sp. s, ps d 2-3 ft hummingbird, butterflies, bees purple, red, white
Bloodroot Sanguinaria canadensis shade wd 6 in. Bees (important early) White,ephemeral
Coneflowers Echinacea sp. s d 2-3 ft butterflies (host), bees pink, yellow
Golden Alexander Zizia aurea ps d, m 2 ft butterflies (host), flies, wasps, bees yellow
Purple Poppy Mallow Callirhoe involucrata s m, wd 1–2 ft bees, hummers, rodents, beetles bright pink
Red Honeysuckle Lonicera sempervirens s, d d 8 ft vine Hummingbirds, bees bright red
Serviceberry (shrub) Amelanchier sp. s, ps m 5-10 ft bees, wasps, flies white – blooms very early
Spicebush (shrub) Lindera benzoin ps, d, wd 6ft butterflies (host) yellow
Sweetspire (shrub) Itea virginica ps m 3-7ft bees, butterflies/ moths, flies, wasps white
Wild Columbine Aquilegia canadensis s, ps wd 2ft hummingbirds, bees red and yellow
SUMMER BLOOMING
Anise Hyssop Agastache sp. and cultivars s d 2-3 ft. hummingbird, bees, butterflies purple to pink, herb
Bee balm, Bergamot, etc. Monarda sp s  wd 2-3 ft hummingbird, bees, moths, butterflies, purple, white, red
Buttonbush (shrub) Cephalanthus occidentalis s  m 8 ft. bees, butterflies, moths, wasps, flies white
Garden Phlox Phlox paniculata s, ps  d 2- 4 ft butterflies, bees, moths pink, white, purple
Gayfeather, Blazingstar Liatris sp. s  wd 2-4 ft. butterflies, bees, moths, wasps, flies purple
Milkweed Asclepias sp s  d 1 to 6 ft. butterflies (host), bees white, orange, purple, yellow
Rose Mallow Hibiscus moscheutos s  d, m 3-8 ft hummingbirds, bees, beetles white, pink with red throat
Royal Catchfly Silene regia s  wd 3 ft hummingbirds bright red
Black-eyed Susan Rudbeckia sp s  wd 2-5 ft bees, butterflies (esp. laciniata) yellow
St. John’s Wort Hypericum sp. s, ps  wd 1-3 ft bees yellow
Sunflowers Helianthus sp. s  d, wd 3-8 ft butterflies, bees, wasps, beetle yellow, orange
LATE SUMMER AND FALL BLOOMING
Aster Aster, sp. s, ps wd 1-4 ft all pollinators, butterfly host purple, pink white
Cardinal Flower Lobelia cardinalis ps m 1-3 ft hummingbirds red
Goldenrod Solidago sp s, ps d 1-3 ft bees, butterflies, moths, flies, wasps yellow
Great Blue Lobelia Lobelia siphilitica ps, m m 1-3 ft bees, hummingbirds purple
Joe Pye Weed

(and cultivars)

Eutrochium purpureum s, ps m 3-5 ft butterflies (host) moths, bees light purple to pink
Mist Plant Conoclinium coelestinum s, ps m 1-3 ft Butterflies, bees purple

 

Online Resources – Education about Pollinators

POLLINATION – ONLINE EDUCATION RESOURCES:

 

BEES

BUTTERFLIES

 

Ziesmer Awarded GCKY Enrichment Award

Robert L. (Bob) Ziesmer, Danville, was awarded the Garden Club of Kentucky Enrichment Award at the 2019 state meeting held in Berea in April 2019. The award is given annually to a non-garden club member or organization that exemplifies the goals of the Garden Club of Kentucky.

Bob Ziesmer supplies not only his friends in the community with produce from his gardens, he supplies Grace Cafe, a local non-profit pay-as-you-can restaurant committed to serving fresh, healthy, local food regardless of the patron’s ability to pay for it.

His newest project is to raise vegetables which are typically found in Syrian markets for the two Syrian refugee families who have recently settled in Danville. Not only does he provide for his Syrian friends, he has introduced these exciting and exotic vegetables into the greater Danville community.

Working with Centre College students and students from Boyle County High School, Bob has expanded his efforts in planting more and larger gardens to provide these “new” vegetables. Around town, he is known as “Centre Grandpa.”

The award was presented by Donna Smith, GCKY first vice-president, and Gigi Biles, state historian and member of the Garden Club of Danville, who nominated Bob for the award.

Submitted by Gigi Biles

Read the article

Monarch Waystations

If you plant it, they will come!

The Monarchs are here and they love the bright colors of zinnias and sunflowers as they float through the gardens of Kentucky, but they also  need their only host plant, Milkweed, to lay their eggs on.  Fall is ideal for planting and now many garden centers are offering discounts on their inventory.  If you have an existing butterfly garden, you may only need to plant Milkweed to be complete and certify your garden through Monarchwatch.org, a non-profit group at the University of Kansas that tracks the migration and habitat of this declining beauty.  You, too, can have a Monarch Waystation with a good plan and desire to help.

Happy Butterflying!

If you plant it, they will come
If you plant it, they will come

IMG_1506

IMG_1515 IMG_1532

IMG_1546

Milkweed and Friends
Milkweed and Friends
Plant an assortment of annuals and perennials
Plant an assortment of annuals and perennials
Welcome to my garden
Welcome to my garden