Garden Club of KY

Garden Tips – November

 “To nurture a garden is to feed not just the body, but the soul.” ~ Alfred Austin, English poet.

We are in that awkward transition time of year when it is often too early and too late to do chores. Take one day at a time and hope for the best. Generally, nature is forgiving.

  • Garden – Dig summer bulbs before the ground freezes. The moon phase this weekend makes it a good time to sow bachelor buttons, calendula, nicotiana, and sweet alyssum.
  • Take advantage of end-of-the-season sales. For a quick and easy compost bin, connect pallets to form a three-sided box.
  • House plants – Check new houseplants and those recently returned from outdoors, for emerging insects. Draw water the night before using. Quart milk jugs make good watering cans. Start forcing poinsettia using nature light as it does not like artificial. Decorate a door by hanging a straw wreath to which has been added dried dill, valerian, rue(wear gloves when handling), and other materials from your yard. Do not hang wreaths that include berried branches on doors as they attract birds and a mess.
  • Trees – Wrap young tree trunks with tree guard(paper or other protective material) to create a shield from winter winds, freeze/thaw, and male deer rubbing their antlers against the trunk and branches. Piled branches around small trees will discourage deer from getting close to the trees.
  • Vegetables – When beds are leaned, place a thin layer of chopped leaves on top. Cover with black plastic or tarp that will block light and kill weeds over-winter. Fasten down with tent stakes, wood boards, or bricks to hold in place.
  • Pets – Protect pets on Halloween. Keep them inside or in a safe kennel. Secure chocolate in containers as it is lethal to dogs.

Garden Tips for August

  • Compost – Composting container size depends on the space you have available. It can be as small as a sweater plastic box to a series of bins similar to those at the Arboretum. For more information request UK Extension Service pamphlet HO-75 or google Home Composting: A Guide to Managing Yard Waste to download it.  Cornell University: cwmi.css.cornell.edu, go to Composting(bottom of the page), Home Composting.
  • Garden – Continue to spray roses for black spot and powdery mildew. Bag black spot foliage on the plant and soil and destroy. Powdery mildew on lilacs not harm but looks bad. Control it with rose fungicide. Cut Liatris, to enjoy now and later as dried material for fall wreaths. Remove most of the foliage and place in a container without water. Order lilies and plant as soon as they arrive.
  • Pour left-over coffee(without cream, milk, or sugar, and unflavored) around acidic plants to add nitrogen to the plants. Dilute it if using it to water acid-loving houseplants to prevent build-up of acid. Do not water more than once a week.
  • Lawn – Dig dried patches for grubs. If more than ten per square foot are found, treat with a fast- acting insecticide. If your leaf blower needs replacing, purchase one that also vacuums and mulches the leaves.
  • Trees and shrubs – Prune out or hand pick bagworms. By now insecticides are not effective.
  • Plant evergreens. Before planting trees and shrubs, fill the hole with water, and saturate the plant’s root ball. Once the hole has drained, plant so that the root ball is level with the ground. If your automatic irrigation system or the soil is slow to drain, plant slightly higher than the ground level. Mulch, but no more than three inches and three inches from the trunk.
  • Vegetables – Compost or till under spent vegetable plants. For larger gourds, but no more, pinch the growing tips when fruit is set. Continue planting seed directly in the ground for a fall harvest. Dry onions for two weeks before storing.

Things to Do in Your Garden – July

Garden – Continue to deadhead flowers. Snap daylily spent blooms late afternoon or evening so that you will wake up to a neat garden. Recycle spent bloom into the compost. Herbicide sprays drift even on calm days. Apply weed killer by using a painter’s trim roller. Porous plant containers dry faster than plastic and may need watering more than once a day.

Hummingbirds – Change feeder sugar water every three days during the summer, using white cane sugar (Domino or C&H), only. Hummers do not like beet sugar. The Hummingbird Society states, “Do not use any other sugar – not turinado(golden-colored raw sugar), raw, powdered(it contains starch) brown, or organic – and never use honey or artificial sweeteners. Spring water is preferred, but most tap water is acceptable.” Honey produces a fungus that clogs their throats resulting in death.

Monarchs – Whether you raise Monarchs in container to release, or observe them in your garden inspect their caterpillars for the tachinid fly eggs. The yellowish mass on their backs will eventually kill them. To destroy the eggs, Monarch Butterfly Garden recommends rinsing the caterpillars and then gently rubbing off the eggs. It will not harm the caterpillars.

Trees – Inspect trees for breakage, splitting and cracks from high winds and rains. Cut damaged into the healthy, solid wood, or back to the tree collar. The collar is a series of rings found where limbs grow from the trunk. The collar cells will scab over the cut. Do not cut into it or flush with the trunk. Painting or other artificial treatment will seal in insects and disease.

Trees that have lost half of their limbs should be removed.

Check for tree borers that appear in spring and summer. Insecticide treatment timing is critical as larvae enter the tree, 10-14 days after hatching treatment is ineffectual. Indications are frass(sawdust), round holes in the bark, and tree limbs dying from the base upwards.

Save Oct 7 for Carriage House Dedication

Wallis Arboretum Carriage House Restored

Carriage House at Wallis HouseThe Nannine Clay Wallis Arboretum Committee has announced the “Save This Date” for the newly restored 1903 Carriage House dedication. Monday, October 7, 1:00, The Garden Club of Kentucky will sponsor the ribbon cutting and special presentations to the Honorable Order of Kentucky Colonels for its emergency grant and to GCKY members and clubs that made possible the restoration. The public is invited to join in the celebration followed by refreshments and tour of the Carriage House.

The restored Carriage House is taking on a new function in the Arboretum. It will be used for classes, workshops, and rentals for parties, weddings and other special events.

Mrs. Wallis’ father, Thomas Clay, built the Carriage House when he purchased the 616 Pleasant Street property from his uncle’s estate. The house was in the Clay family from 1856 until 1970 when Mrs. Wallis bequeathed it to GCKY.

Garden Tips – June 2019

Visit the Wallis Arboretum’s Butterfly, Entrance, Children’s and other gardens throughout. Come enjoy. Share the adventure with children.

Birds – Filling bird feeders can be messy. Measure how much each feeder will hold fill several self-sealing bags, or gallon milk jugs and mark for which feeder. As a feeder needs filling use one of the pre-measured containers.

Garden

  • Remove rose blackspot foliage from the plant and surrounding soil. Spray foliage top and underneath, and replace the soil of container grown roses. Destroy foliage and soil. Start a blackspot program.
  • Divide hosta and plant in afternoon shade location. Varieties that are deep green and have a blue cast need dappled or full shade.
  • Plant marigolds, lavender and other highly scented plants to deter deer and rabbits.
  • Hummingbirds love pineapple sage’s red flowers and sweet fragrance.

Report Your Monarch Sightings!

Did you know that you can report your sightings of monarch eggs, caterpillars, and butterflies?  This will allow your sightings to be part of one of the largest data bases recording sightings in North America – Journey North.  Go to http://www.learner.org/jnorth, or just google “Journey North”. You will be asked to select a password.  I recommend having Journey North remember your password for the future.  Then just follow the directions to report your sightings.  You can go back later to look at them if you wish; and you can see your sightings represented on the United States map that tracks the migration.  Tip:  You don’t need to know your latitude and longitude as requested, they will figure it out for you. It is, however, kind of fun to use their tool to figure it out for yourself.  

Dont spray the Aphids!  Look for the caterpillar!

Dont spray the Aphids! Look for the caterpillar!

 

Monarch Caterpillar on Milkweed

Monarch Caterpillar on Milkweed

Monarch Caterpillar on Milkweed

 

Monarch Caterpillar on Tropical Milkweed

Monarch Caterpillar on Tropical Milkweed

Revised Invasive Plant List Issued to the Public

PRESS RELEASE

 For Immediate Release                
Contact: Beverly James,
859 351-7770, or Joyce Bender, 502 573-2886

 Revised Invasive Plant List Issued to the Public –
Kentucky Exotic Pest Plant Council releases updated list of invasive pest plants after thorough review by state experts

Frankfort, KY. (July 22, 2013) – The Kentucky Exotic Pest Plant Council (KY-EPPC) has published a revised list of 180 non-native invasive plants that are having a negative impact on Kentucky’s landscapes.  After a year-long review in consultation with leading weed experts, university professors, and natural areas land managers, the revised list is more comprehensive in scope and takes new regional data into consideration.  This list is non-regulatory and serves as a reference for agencies, universities, land managers, horticulture professionals, and private landowners.

The list has four rankings describing the threat of invasiveness – severe, significant, moderate, and watch.  There are now 41 species considered a severe threat, with 12 species added to this category since the last review.  These are most likely to cause environmental degradation and increase costs for control or eradication.  The watch category highlights exotic plants that have not been observed or well-documented in Kentucky, but are considered a threat in neighboring states.  Beverly James, KY-EPPC president said “We hope this addition will lead to the early detection of new weeds and allow a more rapid response before they have a chance to become well established.” 

Established in 2000, the KY- EPPC works to raise public awareness about the growing threat that non-native invasive plants pose to Kentucky’s rich natural heritage.  Invasive exotic plants arrived in the US by accident or on purpose and out-compete native species because the natural controls that kept them in balance in their native range do not occur here.  While kudzu may be the most notorious example, there are many species that are eliminating habitat for rare plants and animals, reducing production potential of forestlands and grasslands, choking lakes and other aquatic habitats, growing over recreational trails and causing safety concerns along highways.  All of these impacts are costing millions of dollars in management.

Professionals and citizen scientists can easily report observations of non-native invasive plants with EddMaps  (http://www.eddmaps.org/southeast/index.html).   Homeowners can help by becoming familiar with what is growing in their yard and choosing native plants, which support a higher diversity of pollinators, birds, and other wildlife. There are also natural areas and parks throughout the state that need volunteers to help with eradicating invasive plants.  The KY-EPPC can help connect people to volunteer opportunities in their area.   For more information, please contact KY-EPPC President Beverly James at floracliff@aol.com.

Welcome to Our New Site

Welcome to Our Web Site

Thank you for your interest in the Garden Club of Kentucky, Inc. by visiting our new website. We are a dedicated group of gardeners all across Kentucky that love to share our passion and knowledge of horticulture, gardening and our dedication as stewards of the land. Please feel free to contact us if you would like to locate or start a club in your community or just need advice in your garden.
Our garden gates are always open!
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