President’s Update

2022 SAR/NGC Report

I cannot believe it has been just over a year since I was installed as Garden Club of Kentucky State President.   Thank you for the honor and privilege of serving in this capacity.  It has been a quick year!  Lots of time at the computer…but a very enjoyable year! 

‘Let’s Grow’ needed to be part of a four-year plan instead of two.  We wanted to see our state garden club grow in every way possible and that included more new clubs.  With encouragement and leadership of several of our officers and members, we are slowly gaining new clubs.  We are still committed to this as all our officers.  The NGC Membership Mondays have provided us with new enthusiasm and ideas.  The best one is invite, invite, invite.

Special projects of ‘Gardening with Native Plants’ and ‘Habitats for our Wildlife:  Animals, Birds, Insects and Plants’ have continued this past year.  We met again with Department of Transportation Secretary to discuss planting wildflowers on highway medians and using signage to denote those areas.  Much of the discussion was how can invasive plants be decreased or limited.  We were pleased to hear that many acres are already being planted in native plants.  And Boone’s Ridge is slowly but surely making advances toward completion.  The Garden Club of Kentucky has partnered with this wildlife preserve in southeastern Kentucky to help furnish wildflower seeds to be planted over several acres of land, providing food for the many birds and animals that live there and for the migrating birds through that area. 

Still, many meetings had to be by Zoom.  Yet this was better than not being connected at all.  We had monthly zoom meetings with programs of interest to our members during less hectic months of the year.  The membership data base has allowed this president to get out information to our members quickly and efficiently.  We have been able to keep in touch despite Covid restrictions.

Our state has had Blue Star Memorial Dedications, including the one at the new Kentucky Welcome Center on I-75 coming in from Tennessee.   We are planning on having a Gold Star Dedication later this spring or early summer.  Flower shows were held across the state and a new series of Flower Show Schools began in early May at our state headquarters in Paris.  There are already many flower shows scheduled and garden tours, too, for this upcoming spring and summer.

Plans are being made to have another Kid’s Day at headquarters with this one having an emphasis on garden to table.  Our five state districts are asked to grow different vegetables and fruits and herbs in containers, taking them with seed packs intact, to headquarters for the children to see.  Behind the carriage house, a vegetable garden is being planted as well.  This will help educate many young children to learn how food is grown and where it comes from…from seed to ready to eat!

The SAR Convention at Boone Tavern was a huge success with many members present from all five states in the South Atlantic Region.  Many thanks goes out to SAR Director Marty Bowers, Carla Hawkins, Connie Crain, and all the convention committee members for their work in making this ‘the most welcoming convention ever’, according to one of the members in attendance from South Carolina.  

And you will all remember the devastation caused by tornadoes that ravaged western Kentucky.  Several of our clubs lost gardening tools and had their community gardens destroyed.  Garden club members in Missouri reached out with suggestions how to address this since they had experienced the same type of devastation a few years before.  Garden clubs from other states sent donations.  Our state Executive Committee established the GCKY Natural Disaster Re-Leaf Fund to help with this disaster and future ones.  Donations continue to trickle in and are being placed in a special account to be used to help provide trees and other plants, especially native ones.  We are making efforts to partner with other entities as well.  Recovery will take time.  There was a Kentucky Arbor Day Ceremony in Mayfield on April 1, celebrating trees with a ceremonial tree planting and tree seedling distribution.  What a great way to give hope to the community!

Let’s try to cautiously put Covid behind us and look to the future as we learn to live in uncertain times.  I challenge each club and club member to do more projects, do more programs, do more planting, and do more inviting this coming year, starting today.  Let’s Grow!

Carcille Carloftis Burchette, President

Garden Club of Kentucky, Inc.

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Franklin-Simpson Involvement Form

Franklin-Simpson GC Signups
First
Last

My Contact Info

Address
Address
City
State/Province
Zip/Postal
The best way(s) to contact me:

Reaching out

I would like to be a:

At Club Meetings...

These tasks are scheduled, so you can pick the month(s) that work for you
I can help with...
I can bring:
I would like to

Standing Committees

Can you help our club get things done? LEADERS chair the committee, PLANNERS decide what the committee does and how to do it, HELPERS show up when it's time to do the work
Conservation Committee
Earth Day, Arboretum, Recycling, Clean Air and Water, etc.
Program & Field Trip Committee
choose topics and speakers, coordinate schedules
Hospitality Committee
Refreshments and decorations at meeting and events
Membership Committee
Connect with people, encourage membership and involvement. Handle attendance sheets
Finance Committee
Budget, bookkeeping, grant applications, fundraising
Communication Committee
Publicity, Yearbook, Scrapbook, Newsletters, Award Applications, Website, Facebook Page, Photographs, etc.

Special Events

These events are traditions in our Franklin community. LEADERS chair the committee, PLANNERS decide what the committee does and how to do it, HELPERS show up when it's time to do the work
Earth Day (April)
Staff the booth, set up and take down, develop activities
Garden Tour (June)
Select locations, schedule workers, do publicity , sell tickets
Horticultural Show (Summer)
Event is sponsored by Simpson County
Flower Show (August)
Choose theme, develop schedule, decorate site, staff the event, clean up
Veterans Day (Nov. 11)
Work with Veterans Groups and DAR to create an event at the Veteran Plaza at the Post Office

Projects

Help beautify our community! LEADERS chair the committee, PLANNERS decide what the committee does and how to do it, HELPERS show up when it's time to do the work
Farmers' Market Sales
Staff our booth, bring things to sell. Usually once a month
Library Garden
Post Office Garden
Monarch Waystation
at the Old Jail
Yard of the Month
Solicit applications, choose the winner each month, send out publicity release, set out and collect the yard sign
Arboretum at Greenlawn
label and identify trees, develop plan for future, do some landscaping and tree pruning
what would you like to learn about? where do you want to go?
Got questions? Anything you think we should do differently as a club? What would you like to see? Let us know!

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Lassie Gregory Page

Lassie Gregory Page

Mon 18 Mar 1918 – Sun 16 Jan 2022

Garden Club Member

Franklin-Simpson Garden Club   

Dogwood District

 

Lassie Gregory Page was a long-time member of the Franklin Garden Club, and a life-long resident of Franklin, Kentucky, where she was graduated high school in 1946 and attended First Baptist Church. She was a retired founding employee of Franklin Bank & Trust Company, from which she retired as Senior Vice President after 42 years. She enjoyed spending time with her family of children, grandchildren, and great-grandchildren, vacationing in Orange Beach, Alabama, traveling, playing cards, and gardening.

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Gardening Tasks in Autumn

St. Francis is the patron saint to all who love nature, especially birds and small animals. Give the birds a special treat and corn for the squirrels.

Poison Ivy – Dig and spray before foliage turns wonderful fall colors. Cover your hands and any exposed skin with Dawn Ultra (antibacterial), let it dry, and when you finish wash the Dawn off.

  • HYDRANGEA – Prune back Annabelle hydrangeas no more than every third year and then when the blooms turn brown. If stems are leggy and weak cut back only to 18” give support to spring growth.
  • BULBS – Plant tulips 12” deep or three times its height depending on the bulb. The deeper hole will increase the number of years the bulbs will continue their original size. If it is a new bed, plant daffodils this year and other subsequent years and daffodils exude a toxin squirrels and other rodents don’t like. It is a good idea to always wear gloves when gardening especially if sensitive to lilies(any member of the family).
  • Houseplants – Protect houseplants outdoors when temperatures drop below 50 overnight. Bring them inside between the time the air-conditioning is turned off and heat turned on.  Thanksgiving and Christmas cacti need to remain until the night temperatures are consistently 50 or less, in order to set their buds. Protect indoors plants by isolating those coming indoors, especially recently purchased plants.
  • Lawn – Pick up branches, twigs and toys before mowing. They can be dangerous projectiles. Make sure small children are not in the yard and do not hold them while mowing or riding back to the storage area.
  • Vegetables – When spent plants are removed, compost those not diseased and take a soil sample to your Extension agent to test what it is lacking. Do not save seeds from hybrid plants as this year’s seeds will not come back true and do not carry the resistance of their parents. 

Carolyn Roof

carolynroof02@gmail.com

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Theresa Louise Perros

Flower Show Judge

Theresa Louise Perros

Sun 24 Mar 1912 – Thu 7 Oct 2021

Garden Club Member

The Garden Club of Danville   

Blue Grass District

 

Theresa was a 50 year member of the The Garden Club of Danville and President two times.
A strong supporter of The Garden Club of Kentucky, Inc., she believed that each of us could play an important role in keeping this club interesting and educational for our members throughout the Commonwealth. Theresa was a certified Flower Show Judge. Her talents and friendly ways were shared and enjoyed by many.

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Dawn Redwood in the Arboretum

Did you know that the Wallis Arboretum is the site of two pre-historic trees: Ginkgo biloba and Metasequoia glyptostroboides? Both species are from China, the fossil records of ginkgo dating to more than 200 million years ago and metasequoia (also known as the Dawn Redwood) a mere 50 million.

As was–and is–the custom from the time the house was built in 1850, the latest introductions were always planted at 616 Pleasant Street. A row of ginkgos separated the family area from the cutting and vegetable garden.

The metasequoia did not arrive at the arboretum until the 1950s. The species was once prolific in North America, Japan and China, so much so that its fossil remains are Oregon’s State Fossil. The species was considered extinct until 1938 when a Chinese botanist discovered a living tree in China. With the threat of war, it was not until the late 1940s that Arnold Arboretum (Harvard) funded a trip to collect seed, sending them on to various countries and the Missouri Botanical Garden (MOBOT)

Metasequoia is the smallest of the three living species of redwood, the the other two being the Coastal Redwood (Sequoia sempervirens) in the Pacific Northwest and the Giant Redwood (Sequoiadendron giganteum) in the Sierra Nevada mountains. They are cousins and easy to confuse, though Metasequoia foliage is scaley and deciduous, while redwood’s foliage is needle-like.

Metasequoia is a beautiful tree that with a trunk that buttresses with age. It has reddish bark that exfoliates in narrow strips. In the fall, needles turn orange-brown to red-brown.

Today, the ‘living fossil’ (as it is often called) is readily available to the average grower. Unless you have extensive room, do not plant it as it grows 3-5’ a year, reaching over 100’ and 25’ wide. It grows best in a sunny location and even tolerates dry soil and hardy in zones 5-8.

In ‘Dirr’s Hardy Trees and Shrubs’ he states that a single specimen is an imposing sight, but groupings and groves are also effective as attested by the grove planted at MOBOT in 1947. 

If your yard is not big enough for metasequoia, visit the Nannine Clay Wallis Arboretum any time. It is open to the public with no fee.

For more information about Metasequoia go to: landscapearchitecturemagazine.org, The Metasequoia Mystery

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October – Things to do in the Garden

  • Goldenrod has come into full bloom. Our KY state flower is not the cause of allergic reaction as its pollen is heavy and falls to the ground. The pollen of ragweed, its companion, is light-weight and blows in the wind.
  • Allow fall asters to remain over winter and cut back early spring. Monarch butterflies depend on them for their migration south.
  • Cut a few Shasta daisies to enjoy inside. At three years, Shasta will begin to become leggy and needs to be removed. Each year replace the oldest and plant with new to have continuous dense blooming and healthy plants.
  • Roses – Leave rose hips and dead roses on the bush. Hips feed birds while dead roses indicate to the bush cease blooming. Add a tablespoon of bleach and of sugar to half gallon of water to keep cut roses fresh.
  • Lawn – Raking time is here. For less back stress from raking, pull the rake toward you as you walk away from the leaves. Form rows of leaves, mow using a mulching blade and repeat in the opposite direction to break down the leaves enough over winter to add nutrients and improve soil quality.
  • Trees and shrubs – Plant trees and shrubs. Viburnums create a great screen to block a bad view and are not picky about soil or environment. Pick up walnut and buckeye seeds daily. Bending over or squatting to pick up is good exercise and prevents tripping on the pellicle (heavy seed coating) and reduces lawnmower thrown projectiles.
  • Recycle vines that were removed from trees, lawn and beds to make wreaths and baskets.
  • Order live or cut Christmas tree from a reputable nursery.
  • Pick species or wild persimmon fruit once it has colored up but still hard and ripen inside. It will ripen after picking. Pick hybridized varieties when they have ripened on the tree.
  • Recycle spent vegetables by removing and adding to compost. Never compost disease and insect infested plants. 

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When to Prune Hydrangeas

Some hydrangeas are pruned in the fall, some in early spring and some not at all. How am I to know which variety my hydrangea is and when it is supposed to be pruned or not?   Proven-Winners has the simple answer. 

Of the 49 species of hydrangeas, four are native to America, and only six types generally grown in our gardens. Those that produce flower buds on old wood are

  • bigleaf (mophead and lacecap)
  • oakleaf
  • climbing
  • mountain

    New-wood bloomers include

  • panicle(PG or peegee) and
  • smooth (Annabelle series). 

By not pruning old wood that produces buds formed earlier this year, the hydrangeas are more apt to be protected over winter. Late freezes do not harm new-wood bloomer,  as their buds are set after all chance of a spring freeze. If buds are frozen, more will be produced.

New Proven-Winners(P-W) this year include old wood bigleaf (aka florist, mophead or lacecap) “Let’s Dance Can Do” and “Let’s Dance Do It”. Both stunning. 

New-wood introductions include Firelight Tidbit, a dwarf bush with large flower heads, and Quick Fire Fab (true to its Fab name). Both are panicle or peegee, so named for the panicles(cluster of flowers) of large or grandiflora flower heads. 

There is an hydrangea for every situation, from 1-2’ to 4-6’, colors from white to magenta and almost every color in between, easy to grow, bloom seemingly forever and some repeat. They do best in moist, well-drained soil and more sun than generally given. Peegees are known for their sun tolerance. They are shallow rooted and will dry quickly. Mulch helps retain water. 

DID YOU KNOW…

You know that hydrangeas likes water, but did you know that ‘hydra’ refers to the seed capsules that resemble ancient Greek water-carrier vessels?

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A Fresh Look at Flower Shows

National Garden Clubs (NGC) has developed a new program to promote NGC Flower Shows. The program involves the Kentucky Judges Council to encourage and mentor clubs wishing to hold a flower show by providing information and support on schedule writing, awards, and procedures and then to guide the club through the flower show process. This program is designed for garden clubs that have never held an NGC Flower Show or garden clubs that have not held a flower show in the last five years.

To get your club started on the path to a fun and successful Flower Show, please contact the Judges Council President, Mary W. Turner (mary.turner@tetratech.com | 859-361-0799). A Mentor Judge will be assigned to your club and will provide you with a packet of information about staging an NGC Flower Show, including a sample Flower Show Schedule, a list of NGC Awards, and a list of the necessary supplies that can be ordered from NGC. With assistance from your Mentor Judge, your club will tailor the information to fit your needs and preferences and will work with you throughout the process—from beginning to end. Clubs that participate will be recognized with a certificate signed by the NGC President, Mary Warshauer.

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Worthy Programs Photo Archiving

The photo archiving of your club’s accomplishments celebrates the projects, events, and activities of the members of National Garden Clubs, Inc. Your club’s photographs will be posted on our website and shared across other platforms such as our Facebook page. You can share your garden club pictures with other garden clubbers and the world!

Examples of pictures for posting:

    • Blue Star Memorial plantings and dedications
    • Flower show staging
    • Wildflower plantings
    • Civic beautification projects
    • Aquatic eco-systems projects
    • Youth Gardening Projects
    • Arbor Day plantings
    • Award Ceremonies
    • School Garden Projects
    • Plant it Pink projects
    • Anything else you want to brag about!

Be sure to identify your club, district, and the location of your photo.

Send pictures to GCKY’s Photo Archiving Chair Mary W. Turner (mary.turner@tetratech.com). You may also reach Mary at 859-361-0799 if you have any questions or need additional information.

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