William Beau Weston Awarded GCKY Enrichment Award For 2020 

This award is given annually to a non-garden club member or organization that exemplifies the goals of The Garden Club of Kentucky.                 

Thanks to the vision and dedication of one man, Danville’s tree canopy will be increased by at least 500 trees in the space of 10 years, most of them lining the city’s main streets. William Beau Weston, Professor of Sociology at Centre College, has been working for years to shade the city’s sidewalks. 

Weston walks daily from his home on St. Mildreds Court near Centre’s campus, down Main Street, to his unofficial “office” at a local coffee shop downtown.  After the ice storm of 2009 took down so many old trees, his walk lost most of its shade. His first project was to organize the householders of St. Mildreds Court to plant 26 trees on their street. This led to a more ambitious plan to shade the sidewalks of Danville, which became the Danville Tree Fund.

In 2014 Weston learned about Kentucky Utility’s “Plant for the Planet” program. The program is modeled after the United Nations Environment Program’s “Billion Tree Campaign.” The purpose of this international effort is to bring individuals, communities, and businesses together to collectively plant over one billion trees worldwide each year. 

KU’s program is designed to encourage nonprofit organizations and local government agencies to plant more trees. A grant application must be submitted each year. For 5 out of the past 6 years, Kentucky Utilities has given the Danville program a grant to match what is raised locally, up to $5,000 a year. Grant winners have not yet been announced for 2019, but there is every hope that funds collected this year will be matched for next year’s tree planting. So far approximately $35,000 raised locally has been matched by KU. This wouldn’t have happened without the dedication of Beau Weston. 

He began by asking the Danville City Commission for its blessing in applying for the grants. The commissioners enthusiastically gave him the go-ahead. This became a joint effort of many individuals and organizations. Weston worked tirelessly in the beginning to connect the people who collectively run the program and to set up a secure system for collecting and disbursing the funds raised. 

By networking with many organizations, he came up with a winning combination: The county extension agent chooses the species of trees; the Danville Beautification Committee, which is made up of local citizens, picks the spots to plant the trees; the city of Danville provides the labor to plant and maintain the trees; and the Wilderness Trace Community Foundation handles the money. This is a perfect example of different constituencies working together for the common good – the city, the state (through the extension service), volunteer civic agencies, community betterment groups, KU’s corporate foundation, and many private citizens

Weston aims to collect at least $5,000 each year and is persistent in soliciting contributions from individuals and organizations before the grant application is due in November. One hundred dollars, matched by an equal amount from KU will buy one tree, but donations of any size are accepted. The goal is 50 trees a year and, depending on tree prices, it has been up to 75 trees planted in one year.  

Every year he sends out emails to anyone who might be remotely interested and arranges for publicity in the newspaper and on social media. Local organizations have contributed since the program began, along with many individuals, families, and businesses. Each year since 2017 Weston has applied for and been awarded a $500 grant from the Garden Club of Danville, which uses profits from its garden tours to support gardening and environmental projects.          

The trees are a mixture of species, especially native ones, that are suitable for high-traffic streets. They are sizable trees three inches in diameter and about 10-feet high. The KU grant requires that the trees be watered and maintained for at least three years, which is done by the city. Each tree gets a water bag for the first year and is watered as necessary for two more years. The city of Danville picks up the trees from the seller, stores them until planting time, plants them, supplies and fills the “gator” water bags, and maintains the trees. Weston says that these larger trees have a much better survival rate than the seedlings planted by some other organizations.

In the past six years over 300 trees have been planted along Danville streets, thanks to Beau Weston’s initiative and organizational skills. He has noted that the purpose of the project is to enhance the beauty and livability of Danville by providing all the things that trees are good for – shade, beauty, oxygen, animal and insect habitat, heat control, and civic pride. The Danville Tree Fund furthers all the objectives of the Garden Club of Kentucky by promoting interest in and knowledge of trees, beautifying our community, and cooperating with other agencies to promote conservation of native plants. 

Nominated by The Garden Club of Danville  


News articles

Ziesmer Awarded 2019 GCKY Enrichment Award

Robert L. (Bob) Ziesmer, Danville, was awarded the Garden Club of Kentucky Enrichment Award at the 2019 state meeting held in Berea in April 2019. The award is given annually to a non-garden club member or organization that exemplifies the goals of the Garden Club of Kentucky.

Bob Ziesmer supplies not only his friends in the community with produce from his gardens, he supplies Grace Cafe, a local non-profit pay-as-you-can restaurant committed to serving fresh, healthy, local food regardless of the patron’s ability to pay for it.

His newest project is to raise vegetables which are typically found in Syrian markets for the two Syrian refugee families who have recently settled in Danville. Not only does he provide for his Syrian friends, he has introduced these exciting and exotic vegetables into the greater Danville community.

Working with Centre College students and students from Boyle County High School, Bob has expanded his efforts in planting more and larger gardens to provide these “new” vegetables. Around town, he is known as “Centre Grandpa.”

The award was presented by Donna Smith, GCKY first vice-president, and Gigi Biles, state historian and member of the Garden Club of Danville, who nominated Bob for the award.

Submitted by Gigi Biles

Read the article

Awards

Awards

Through the GCKY, SAR, and NGC awards programs, garden clubs and their members receive recognition for outstanding achievement. Recognition of your club’s activities, projects, and other efforts creates pride and encourages members to further their hard work.

GCKY Awards & Guidelines 2021-2023

Look over the Awards and Guidelines, and you’ll probably find several awards for which your club could apply.

NGC – GCKY Award Application 2021-2023


Club President’s Report


(click here for PDF version of the Award Sponsor Form)


National Garden Club Awards (on NGC website)

  Read the NGC Awards Handbook

for the current application forms and information about

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