Let’s Grow! How clubs increase their membership

‘Let’s Grow!’ is the theme for this administration, and we have grown!  GCKY has 15 clubs that have grown in membership over the previous year and we have gained a new club!

Some of the clubs have shared why their club has increased in membership.

  • A few new members have come from inquiries on our GCKY website and then local clubs reaching out to them.
  • No doubt word of mouth about the programs and activities is one of the best ways to gain members.
  • Invite potential members and then follow up repeatedly with invitations to meetings by e-mails or calls.
  • Club meeting attendance has even improved when current members have been contacted as well.
  • By placing information in local papers about meetings, activities, and emphasizing that the meetings are open to everyone is another good way to get potential members.
  • Having a flower show in the district brought in two new members who were interested in entering the flower show with their designs…they loved floral arranging.
  • Another new member wants to help their club with a webpage.

Our federated clubs have so much to offer!  There is a ‘hook’ for many potential members.  We need to keep letting everyone know about us and how we can impact our communities in such positive ways!

Congratulations to these clubs who increased their membership!

  • Audubon District
    • Gateway GC
  • Blue Grass District
    • Boone Co. GC
    • Gardenside Green Thumb GC
  • Dogwood District
    • Audubon Park GC
    • Beechmont GC
    • GC of Elizabethtown
    • Rambler GC
    • Warren East GC
  • Limestone District
    • Fleming Co GC
    • Four Seasons GC
    • Millersburg GC
    • Paintsville GC
  • Mountain Laurel District
    • Green Thumbs GC
    • Middlesborough GC
    • Rockcastle GC
    • Appalachian Roots GC (new club!)

Native Plants for Pollinators and Wildlife


click this link below to download a printable chart

POLLINATOR PLANTS FOR GCKY

(from The Garden Club of Kentucky), gardenclubky.org

KEY:  s = sunny, ps = part sun, wd = well drained, d = dry, m = moist

Common Name Botanical Name Sun Water Ht Attracts Bloom Color
SPRING TO EARLY SUMMER BLOOMING
Beardtongue Penstemon sp. s, ps d 2-3 ft hummingbird, butterflies, bees purple, red, white
Bloodroot Sanguinaria canadensis shade wd 6 in. Bees (important early) White,ephemeral
Coneflowers Echinacea sp. s d 2-3 ft butterflies (host), bees pink, yellow
Golden Alexander Zizia aurea ps d, m 2 ft butterflies (host), flies, wasps, bees yellow
Purple Poppy Mallow Callirhoe involucrata s m, wd 1–2 ft bees, hummers, rodents, beetles bright pink
Red Honeysuckle Lonicera sempervirens s, d d 8 ft vine Hummingbirds, bees bright red
Serviceberry (shrub) Amelanchier sp. s, ps m 5-10 ft bees, wasps, flies white – blooms very early
Spicebush (shrub) Lindera benzoin ps, d, wd 6ft butterflies (host) yellow
Sweetspire (shrub) Itea virginica ps m 3-7ft bees, butterflies/ moths, flies, wasps white
Wild Columbine Aquilegia canadensis s, ps wd 2ft hummingbirds, bees red and yellow
SUMMER BLOOMING
Anise Hyssop Agastache sp. and cultivars s d 2-3 ft. hummingbird, bees, butterflies purple to pink, herb
Bee balm, Bergamot, etc. Monarda sp s  wd 2-3 ft hummingbird, bees, moths, butterflies, purple, white, red
Buttonbush (shrub) Cephalanthus occidentalis s  m 8 ft. bees, butterflies, moths, wasps, flies white
Garden Phlox Phlox paniculata s, ps  d 2- 4 ft butterflies, bees, moths pink, white, purple
Gayfeather, Blazingstar Liatris sp. s  wd 2-4 ft. butterflies, bees, moths, wasps, flies purple
Milkweed Asclepias sp s  d 1 to 6 ft. butterflies (host), bees white, orange, purple, yellow
Rose Mallow Hibiscus moscheutos s  d, m 3-8 ft hummingbirds, bees, beetles white, pink with red throat
Royal Catchfly Silene regia s  wd 3 ft hummingbirds bright red
Black-eyed Susan Rudbeckia sp s  wd 2-5 ft bees, butterflies (esp. laciniata) yellow
St. John’s Wort Hypericum sp. s, ps  wd 1-3 ft bees yellow
Sunflowers Helianthus sp. s  d, wd 3-8 ft butterflies, bees, wasps, beetle yellow, orange
LATE SUMMER AND FALL BLOOMING
Aster Aster, sp. s, ps wd 1-4 ft all pollinators, butterfly host purple, pink white
Cardinal Flower Lobelia cardinalis ps m 1-3 ft hummingbirds red
Goldenrod Solidago sp s, ps d 1-3 ft bees, butterflies, moths, flies, wasps yellow
Great Blue Lobelia Lobelia siphilitica ps, m m 1-3 ft bees, hummingbirds purple
Joe Pye Weed

(and cultivars)

Eutrochium purpureum s, ps m 3-5 ft butterflies (host) moths, bees light purple to pink
Mist Plant Conoclinium coelestinum s, ps m 1-3 ft Butterflies, bees purple

 

State Champion Red Oak at Wallis Arboretum

Champion Red Oak TreeThe GCKY was presented an award on June 19, 2019,  from the Kentucky Division of Forestry for the State champion Northern Red Oak (Quercus rubra) located in the front yard of the Nannine Clay Wallis Arboretum, headquarters of the Garden Club of Kentucky, Inc.

The certificate was presented to Judy Ferrell, Arboretum Chair, and Joanna Kirby, State Headquarters Chair, by Philip Horsley with the Division of Forestry.
Champion Red Oak Awarded to GCKY

Save Oct 7 for Carriage House Dedication

Wallis Arboretum Carriage House Restored

Carriage House at Wallis HouseThe Nannine Clay Wallis Arboretum Committee has announced the “Save This Date” for the newly restored 1903 Carriage House dedication. Monday, October 7, 1:00, The Garden Club of Kentucky will sponsor the ribbon cutting and special presentations to the Honorable Order of Kentucky Colonels for its emergency grant and to GCKY members and clubs that made possible the restoration. The public is invited to join in the celebration followed by refreshments and tour of the Carriage House.

The restored Carriage House is taking on a new function in the Arboretum. It will be used for classes, workshops, and rentals for parties, weddings and other special events.

Mrs. Wallis’ father, Thomas Clay, built the Carriage House when he purchased the 616 Pleasant Street property from his uncle’s estate. The house was in the Clay family from 1856 until 1970 when Mrs. Wallis bequeathed it to GCKY.

In the Arboretum – June 2019

Traditionally, the first full week of June is National Garden Week. What better way to celebrate gardening than at The Garden Club of Kentucky – Nannine Clay Wallis Arboretum annual Arbor Day Celebration, Friday, June 7. The dedication of plants given in honor and remembrance will begin at 1:30pm at the front entrance of the Wallis House-GCKY Headquarters with Judy Ferrell, Arboretum Chair, and GCKY President Donna Smith welcoming friends, families and all who enjoy gardening.


The Arboretum is at its most lush and flowery due to the mild winter and long wet spring particularly around Mrs. Wallis’ Rose Arbor. In preparation for Arbor Day, the Arbor was scraped, cleaned and newly painted by GCKY members. Mrs. Wallis planted it with climbing roses under planted with iris. Today, the very popular New Dawn (introduced 1989) donated by Millersburg Garden Club several years ago covers the Arbor. Connecting the Rose Garden and Arbor is one of two original elves that sits on a pedestal surrounded by low growing roses and hellebores.

American Pillar (introduced 1902), planted by Mrs. Wallis continues to grow on the left end of the Pergola. It has proved to be one of the hardiest ramblers, vigorous, drought resistant and one of the few tolerates partial shade.

Mrs. Wallis always planted the newest and best varieties when introduced. As a demonstration garden, the Arboretum continues to plant new while maintaining those that are best suited for our area.

Emphasis this year has been the addition of sun-loving annual including alyssum, begonia, lantana, marigold petunia and perennial verbena that will provide color through and into fall. and alyssum in the border beds.

May blooming Cornus kousa (Korean dogwood) are in full bloom. Unlike C. florida whose foliage appears as blooms fade, C. kousa’s foliage emerges first to highlight its stunning pointed white blooms. 

Ziesmer Awarded GCKY Enrichment Award

Robert L. (Bob) Ziesmer, Danville, was awarded the Garden Club of Kentucky Enrichment Award at the 2019 state meeting held in Berea in April 2019. The award is given annually to a non-garden club member or organization that exemplifies the goals of the Garden Club of Kentucky.

Bob Ziesmer supplies not only his friends in the community with produce from his gardens, he supplies Grace Cafe, a local non-profit pay-as-you-can restaurant committed to serving fresh, healthy, local food regardless of the patron’s ability to pay for it.

His newest project is to raise vegetables which are typically found in Syrian markets for the two Syrian refugee families who have recently settled in Danville. Not only does he provide for his Syrian friends, he has introduced these exciting and exotic vegetables into the greater Danville community.

Working with Centre College students and students from Boyle County High School, Bob has expanded his efforts in planting more and larger gardens to provide these “new” vegetables. Around town, he is known as “Centre Grandpa.”

The award was presented by Donna Smith, GCKY first vice-president, and Gigi Biles, state historian and member of the Garden Club of Danville, who nominated Bob for the award.

Submitted by Gigi Biles

Read the article

Carriage House received Honorable Order of Kentucky Colonels Grant

The Garden Club of Kentucky, Inc., applied for an emergency grant from the Kentucky Colonels to repair and restore the Carriage House in the Nannine Clay Wallis Arboretum. Built in 1903 by Mrs. Wallis’ father, Thomas Clay, its siding and doors had considerable rot due to water damage. It was not until the affected siding was removed that the extensive amount of rot was revealed.

The original single sliding doors on the driveway and opposite side were replaced with two opposing sliding doors to make it easier to open and reduce the weight on the rail when open. Stall and cupola windows, three posts, and siding where needed were replaced. Due to rains and temperature, painting will wait until dry weather later this spring.

The Carriage House has now found a new use. It will be part of our educational programs beginning with the Kids Day at the Arboretum, July 29. The free day of exploring and learning about pollinators is open to children 6-12 when accompanied by a parent or guardian.

 

Report Your Monarch Sightings!

Did you know that you can report your sightings of monarch eggs, caterpillars, and butterflies?  This will allow your sightings to be part of one of the largest data bases recording sightings in North America – Journey North.  Go to http://www.learner.org/jnorth, or just google “Journey North”. You will be asked to select a password.  I recommend having Journey North remember your password for the future.  Then just follow the directions to report your sightings.  You can go back later to look at them if you wish; and you can see your sightings represented on the United States map that tracks the migration.  Tip:  You don’t need to know your latitude and longitude as requested, they will figure it out for you. It is, however, kind of fun to use their tool to figure it out for yourself.  

Dont spray the Aphids!  Look for the caterpillar!
Dont spray the Aphids! Look for the caterpillar!

 

Monarch Caterpillar on Milkweed
Monarch Caterpillar on Milkweed

Monarch Caterpillar on Milkweed

 

Monarch Caterpillar on Tropical Milkweed
Monarch Caterpillar on Tropical Milkweed